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HIPs delayed till 1 August

by mel starrs on June 22, 2007

in Part L

I’m a bit very late in commenting on this, but the inevitable delay to HIPs has been announced.  The government’s phased roll requires HIPs for properties with four or more bedrooms from 1 August, followed by three-bed homes once 2,000 energy assessors have qualified, and all homes when 3,000 have qualified.

On 22 May NHER made this statement:

The Secretary of State confirmed today that 520 energy assessors are currently fully accredited. 419 of these are within our accreditation scheme and we already have an additional 360 in the process of signing up with over 1000 more coming towards the end of their training. Given the number of fully qualified and accredited energy assessors being created every single day, we look forward to the government pushing ahead with full implementation on 1 August. There is no reason why the benefits of energy performance certificates and home information packs should not be realised by all home buyers, not just those who buy four bedroom properties. I am absolutely confident that we will be able to convince government, and even all the vested interests, that everything will in place for full implementation on 1 August.

In a further twist to the story energy-assessors.com has shut its doors, cancelling contracts with it’s assessors, but saying:

“However, because of the EU Performance of Buildings Directive requiring all properties to have an EPC, the longer term future for domestic energy assessors is still assured. This Directive must be delivered no later than January 2009. The 1,000 energy assessors currently undergoing training will continue to train through sister company property-careers.com.”

Friends of the Earth are “furious“:

“We are furious that the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors’ legal challenge has forced the Government to delay the introduction of EPCs. This is bad news for the fight against climate change. Our homes are responsible for over a quarter of UK carbon dioxide emissions. EPCs are a crucial measure that will help householders cut their emissions and energy bills. These measures have been planned for years; they must be urgently implemented, not watered down.”

Whilst I’m a supporter of the EPC, I’m not particularly enamoured with the HIP package. The way HIPs have been presented to the public and portrayed in the media may be part of the problem and the cause of the wide public aversion to the plans. 

However, let’s not forget that EPC’s are mandatory under European legislation and must be in place by January 2009. They are based on a much more robust and well tested calculation method (SAP) than Part L2A of the Building Regs (SBEM).  The methodology is the basis for Part L1A anyway, so all new homes built since 2006 in theory should have the calculation, if not the certificate.

  • http://energyperformancecertificate.wordpress.com/ epctruth

    HIPs lost their relevance when the home condition report was removed as a compulsary document – thank you council of mortgage lenders… Unfortunately a lot of the press coverage which followed is devaluing the EPC and will impact on the effectiveness of the whole scheme. I hope that Yvette Cooper does something quickly to repair the damage, otherwise the target CO2 emmission reduction promised by EPCs will never be realised.

  • http://energyperformancecertificate.wordpress.com/ epctruth

    HIPs lost their relevance when the home condition report was removed as a compulsary document – thank you council of mortgage lenders… Unfortunately a lot of the press coverage which followed is devaluing the EPC and will impact on the effectiveness of the whole scheme. I hope that Yvette Cooper does something quickly to repair the damage, otherwise the target CO2 emmission reduction promised by EPCs will never be realised.