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Is blogging Important, Urgent, or neither?

by mel starrs on March 11, 2008

in Productivity

  Urgent Important matrix

  Recognise the image above? If not, first of all, lucky you. You haven’t been subjected to a corporate seminar* on time management. Secondly, go out and read Stephen Covey’s “Seven Habits of Highly Effective People“. If you’re convinced you don’t have time to read it find an audio copy on www.audible.com and listen in the car, on your commute or at the gym.

  Anyway, back to the subject at hand. Is blogging and keeping up with RSS feeds a quadrant II activity? Or is it quadrant IV? I see much of Facebook as a Q.IV activity – especially that incredibly annoyingly addictive Traveler IQ Challenge , but keeping in touch with people I don’t otherwise get to see is relationship building, and therefore Q.II. More productive relationship building is found on LinkedIn, which I would argue even more strongly is Q.II.

  I see blogging as a kind of values clarification – a way of consolidating thoughts on topics which I believe to be important. And reading RSS feeds is preparation. Now I’m not arguing that reading Go Fug Yourself is a relevant use of my time here (sadly, almost certainly Q.IV) but am I deluding myself? Is blogging and reading blogs a non-urgent but important activity? Thoughts?

 * Books which should absolutely be be banned from any corporate “event” – anything with anthropomorphic figures such as those bl**dy mice in Who Moved My Cheese?

  • Adam

    This grid comes up time and again in various different formats – there is a psychotherapy couselling grid that is very similar and deals with Competency of achieving a task. There is Unconscious incompetency (not knowing what driving is), Conscious incompetency (knowing what driving is, but not knowing how to do it) Conscious competency (learning how to drive) and Unconscious competency (being able to drive without thinking about it. But it always reminds me of the Donald Rumsfeld quote: Known knowns, Known Unknowns, Unknown Knowns and Unknown Unknowns. I can’t believe he was berated for that quote, it makes so much sense. On some level…

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  • Adam

    This grid comes up time and again in various different formats – there is a psychotherapy couselling grid that is very similar and deals with Competency of achieving a task. There is Unconscious incompetency (not knowing what driving is), Conscious incompetency (knowing what driving is, but not knowing how to do it) Conscious competency (learning how to drive) and Unconscious competency (being able to drive without thinking about it. But it always reminds me of the Donald Rumsfeld quote: Known knowns, Known Unknowns, Unknown Knowns and Unknown Unknowns. I can’t believe he was berated for that quote, it makes so much sense. On some level…

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  • http://www.zerochampion.com Phil Clark

    Hi Mel,
    Just dedicated the last hour or so (at work) to reviewing my blog and looking at other ones. Urgent tasks have dominated my working life in recent weeks and the blog has suffered as a result.
    I think there’s always an ebb and flow with such things. It’s difficult to maintain the pace of it. I also find that without external stimulation (meeting people, events etc) it’s difficult to say much that’s fresh.

  • http://www.zerochampion.com Phil Clark

    Hi Mel,
    Just dedicated the last hour or so (at work) to reviewing my blog and looking at other ones. Urgent tasks have dominated my working life in recent weeks and the blog has suffered as a result.
    I think there’s always an ebb and flow with such things. It’s difficult to maintain the pace of it. I also find that without external stimulation (meeting people, events etc) it’s difficult to say much that’s fresh.