Previous post:

Next post:

Finding accredited sustainable building professionals

by Mel Starrs on August 17, 2009

in Accreditation, Funding & Targets, Green Building Rating

I’ve been doing a little market research on various sustainable buildings accreditation schemes for professionals in the UK (rather than the buildings or products) and thought a round up of my findings might be useful to others. Data is correct as of 14 August 2009.

First up is CIBSE‘s LCC (Low Carbon Consultants). There are 1546 LCC’s listed in this directory. From their site: “Members of the Low Carbon Consultants Register are a body of professionals competent to minimize energy use and carbon emissions from buildings both in design and operation. They are able to go beyond the current legal minima in improving the energy performance of both new and existing buildings. Clients can be sure that buildings designed and operated by Low Carbon Consultants will meet the requirements of Part L (Conservation of Fuel and Power) and Building Control Officers can be assured that compliance is being signed off by suitably qualified professionals.”

This leads on to NDEA or non-domestic energy assessors. About a third of LCC’s are also LCEA’s (for EPC’s – there are 943 including DEC and other schemes) through CIBSE, but there are a total of 3,027 (confirmed by the ever wonderful TheyWorkForYou.com – correct on 6 July 2009) through seven providers including BRE (342), Stroma and NHER. The national register is here run by Landmark. Only CIBSE and Stroma appear to have EPC Level 5 (DSM – dynamic simulation modelling). Confused yet?

Talking of BRE, let’s move on to BREEAM assessors. The register is held at Green Book Live. There are approximately 950 non-domestic BREEAM assessors.

And now BRE have launched BREEAM AP. Expect to hear more about this in the near future on this blog. There are currently 21 BREEAM AP (with more to follow as another exam was held on 14 August).

Finally, LEED AP in the UK. The LEED professional directory can be found here. The LEED AP qualification is currently going through some changes following on from the release of LEED 3.0. There are 254 LEED AP in the UK and 1 Green Associate.

What is really fun is where the overlaps start to meet. It’s tough to analyse quickly and easily (so I haven’t looked at it fully) but I’m almost curious enough to get the work done. I was quoted a very reasonable price on eLance. Would anyone else be interested in this data? Would anyone be willing to pay for the results if I go ahead with it? Alternatively, I could play around with Venny for some quick and dirty Venn diagram comparisons.

Finally, it occured to me that there is no national register of renewable energy consultants or energy strategy experts. I would have thought it would be prudent of CIBSE to put such a scheme in place to prevent snake oil salesmen and cowboys jumping on the sustainability bandwagon.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
  • Andrew

    Mel

    I’m thinking of doing the BREEAM AP exam, so I’ll be interested to hear your thoughts on BREEAM AP and how it compares with LEED AP.

    Regards

    Andrew

  • Andrew

    Mel

    I’m thinking of doing the BREEAM AP exam, so I’ll be interested to hear your thoughts on BREEAM AP and how it compares with LEED AP.

    Regards

    Andrew

  • Andrew

    May be of use if you want to draw venn diagrams in excel:

    http://chandoo.org/wp/2009/06/03/venn-diagrams-in-excel/

  • Andrew

    May be of use if you want to draw venn diagrams in excel:

    http://chandoo.org/wp/2009/06/03/venn-diagrams-in-excel/

  • FB

    Hello,

    I am a NDEA, (I think we are called Low Carabon Energy Assessors by CIBSE), LCC, BREEAM Assessor and have just passed the AP exam. The first thing I would say is that LEED and BREEAM will be almost identical. As for the LCC I think the idea is just that they are Services Engineers with an understanding of how to reduce CO2 emissions. I was an LCC and upgraded to NDEA with CIBSE. It was mostly just APEL stuff and a couple of mock models using Hevacomp. The only skill I would say that it added is the ability to understand how to get results out of Hevacomp and a few tricks to getting good results.

    I have been a BREEAM Assessor for four years so I expected the AP exam to be a doddle. ( I was doing it out of interest for our company). The exam was a multiple choice thing on computers, (which kept locking up). The questions on general sustainability in buildings were fairly easy but the tricky questions were about BREEAM, e.g. what type of evidence is acceptable in this case? a) email, b) Letter from architect, c) Specification, or d) drawing. I felt like writing ‘good question’, because no-one else seems to know. One particularly bad one was what kind of building will probably get the best BREEAM rating? a)naturally ventilated, good u-values, and small windows b) Mech. vented with cooling, excellent u-values….etc. I just thought that it was almost impossible to be even as confident as ‘probable’. I passed but they don’t tell you what your score was so I don’t know what the mark needed was. One other surprise was that there were only 6 of us in the exam. I thought there would be loads of architects and M&E engineers adding a string to their bow.

    I think in summary BREEAM and LEED would be on top of each other but LCC, NDEA, etc. wouldd only really figure in the energy/ emissions section. This is interesting because as 2016 and 2019 approach Code for Sustainable Homes and BREEAM will be used to drive zero carbon and the actual low carbon element of BREEAM at least are still fairly small and I wonder if the requirement to get BREEAM or Code ratings will be quietly dropped just keeping the CO2 emission target.

  • FB

    Hello,

    I am a NDEA, (I think we are called Low Carabon Energy Assessors by CIBSE), LCC, BREEAM Assessor and have just passed the AP exam. The first thing I would say is that LEED and BREEAM will be almost identical. As for the LCC I think the idea is just that they are Services Engineers with an understanding of how to reduce CO2 emissions. I was an LCC and upgraded to NDEA with CIBSE. It was mostly just APEL stuff and a couple of mock models using Hevacomp. The only skill I would say that it added is the ability to understand how to get results out of Hevacomp and a few tricks to getting good results.

    I have been a BREEAM Assessor for four years so I expected the AP exam to be a doddle. ( I was doing it out of interest for our company). The exam was a multiple choice thing on computers, (which kept locking up). The questions on general sustainability in buildings were fairly easy but the tricky questions were about BREEAM, e.g. what type of evidence is acceptable in this case? a) email, b) Letter from architect, c) Specification, or d) drawing. I felt like writing ‘good question’, because no-one else seems to know. One particularly bad one was what kind of building will probably get the best BREEAM rating? a)naturally ventilated, good u-values, and small windows b) Mech. vented with cooling, excellent u-values….etc. I just thought that it was almost impossible to be even as confident as ‘probable’. I passed but they don’t tell you what your score was so I don’t know what the mark needed was. One other surprise was that there were only 6 of us in the exam. I thought there would be loads of architects and M&E engineers adding a string to their bow.

    I think in summary BREEAM and LEED would be on top of each other but LCC, NDEA, etc. wouldd only really figure in the energy/ emissions section. This is interesting because as 2016 and 2019 approach Code for Sustainable Homes and BREEAM will be used to drive zero carbon and the actual low carbon element of BREEAM at least are still fairly small and I wonder if the requirement to get BREEAM or Code ratings will be quietly dropped just keeping the CO2 emission target.

  • admin

    Thanks for the input. I think the pass rate for BREEAM AP is 65% which is much less than the 85% for LEED AP.

  • admin

    Thanks for the input. I think the pass rate for BREEAM AP is 65% which is much less than the 85% for LEED AP.